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11.76$54.60$

Not everybody likes this strong, rustic tea… but every pu-erh lover needs to know it! It’s a very classic product of Xiaguan factory since 1980’s produced mainly for Tibetan market – This pressed mushroom shaped tuocha is available in the market both in shu and sheng version… but of course sheng is much more interesting. Tea was stored mainly in Taiwan warehouse in big Yixing jars in balanced (not too dry, not too humid) conditions. It’s interesting to observe that very strong pressing of this tea results in different aging in every part of tuocha – outer parts of tea are more “aged” with darker and more earthy taste but the core of mushroom tuo is much more greener and brighter in taste. Overall character of Xiaguan Jin Cha is strong, pungent, full of woody and hay notes with powerful bitterness and sweet, slightly herbal aftertaste. At the same time you can experience some aged and young flavours. This tea needs more than 4 infusion to wake all tastes up.

Origin: Xiaguan Tea Factory, Yunnan, China.

Vintage:  2003

Cultivar: Camellia Sinensis var. Assamica 

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Product Description

Temperature of water and amount of leaves: 100 C 6,5g/100ml.
Suggested brewing method: Yixing clay teapot or gaiwan of low capacity. First, you should pre-heat empty teapot/gaiwan and tea cups with boiling water. When the teapot is warmed, then you put the tea leaves in. After smelling hot and dry leaves in the pot, rinse the tea for 10s seconds using boiling water and afterwards pour out all the water from your pot. The process of rinsing tea leaves is often defined as a waking the tea and is very important for quality of next brewings. First drinkable infusion should be very short- not more than 10-20 second. We suggest to increase brewing time for 5-10 seconds in each next brewing.

Additional Information

Weight

whole mushroom 230-240g, 50 g, 100 g

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